Four Things I Learned Writing a Rural Setting

By Eva Scott

Here are the four things that I learned while writing my new rural romance, Red Dust Dreaming

1. The importance of a subject-matter expert

It’s not enough to research the hell out of a subject/place, you also need to have a subject matter expert who can check over your work for any slips or mistakes you might inadvertently make. During the writing of Red Dust Dreaming I had a wonderful expert in the form of Dr Sally who is not only an expert on Aboriginal art, but visits Yuendumu regularly. She was invaluable in guiding me through the intricacies of interracial and intercultural exchanges. She saved me from making an innocent blunder and gave the story authenticity.

2. Google Earth rocks!

If you can’t physically get there, then Google Earth is your best friend. It can take you right down to street level and give you a sense of the place you’re writing about. It’s invaluable for checking the look and feel of a place. Combine this with your subject matter expert and you’re well on your way to writing something believable without leaving your desk.

3. Write about something that interests you

I was lucky enough to get a private tour of an Aboriginal art exhibition at the Queensland Art Gallery which set fire to my imagination. This new-found fascination took me on a wonderful journey of discovery and introduced me to some amazing people. When those dog-days hit, the ones where the words just won’t come, the subject matter always managed to re-inspire me and get me back in the game.

4. Be careful of secondary characters!

They have a habit of rising up and taking over the lime light. In Red Dust Dreaming the offending character is Thelma, the housekeeper. She’s strong, sassy and sharp. Reviewers picked up on her straight away and she threatened to steal the show. Back into your box,Thelma!


23722In the battle of duty versus desire, only one can survive the hot Australian sunshine.

Elizabeth Langtree’s has her life in order – safe, organised, planned. Sure, she has her troubles, but they are nothing she can’t handle. Then everything is turned upside down when her family send her to Australia to collect her orphaned nephew.

It all seemed so simple in New York, but Australia is nothing like she expected, and she soon falls under the spell of the Outback – the station, the lifestyle, and the seriously sexy owner who has been caring for Luke since the death of his mother.

Elizabeth soon discovers that what seemed simple a world away is anything but, and her duty is at odds with the dictates of her heart. She must choose, knowing that a mistake will not only cost her everything, but destroy the future of a devastated little boy.

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7 thoughts on “Four Things I Learned Writing a Rural Setting

    • Thanks Rhyll. I was a bit nervous about hitting the right note. Thank goodness for the good Dr Sally! Nothing like a subject matter expert to give a girl confidence.

  1. Sounds like you had a wonderful experience writing RDD, Eva. It’s next up on my iPad and I’m really looking forward to reading it!

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