The Drive to Connect

by Juliet Madison

I wanted to do a different type of blog post for Valentines Day this year, and after being inspired by a couple of articles I read online recently (which I’ll share below), I thought I would write about the one thing that united them – the need for human connection.

pink-heart-1-1252468-mOn Valentines Day people think about romantic connection, but I challenge you to also think beyond that, to think about love in all its forms; love for oneself, for other people, and life itself.

Connecting with people is what makes the world go around, our lives are intertwined on a daily basis with those of others, but just how many of those people do you truly connect with? How often do you take the time to delve deeper, to get to know them, to put aside the obligatory small talk and ask questions that really matter? Not only that, but to listen to the answers with genuine interest and understanding?

There is safety in small talk, safety in staying in our comfort zones and not taking risks. But through making an effort to connect, you may just open up a whole new world of possibilities for any area of your life, be it professional or personal.

Life is short. Make connections, and make them count.

~ One of the articles I found interesting was about addiction, and what its likely cause is. Of course there is a physical, biochemical basis for addiction where the body becomes accustomed to something and makes the person keep wanting it, but what studies have found is that both the likelihood of becoming addicted and the success of recovery rely a lot on human bonding, love, and connection. Those with a healthier social environment and happier state of mind are more likely to beat the addiction. But pushing those who are addicted aside, cutting them off, isolating them, is only exacerbating the disconnection fuelling the addiction. What they need is the opposite – human bonding, connection, and unconditional love. And, I believe, this includes a strong sense of identity and connection with themselves, and self love. You can read the article by Johann Hari about how disconnection drives addiction, here.

So with the high prevalence of addiction in society, there is no better time to understand the importance of human connection. It is the glue that holds society together, it is what we as humans all crave whether we want to admit it or not, it is what matters most in life – feeling like we belong, like we are bonded and supported in life, and experiencing the joy and purpose that comes from this.

~ The other article that caught my attention was in the New York Times, and was fascinating and fun to read. The title, To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This by Mandy Len Catron, makes it sound like a lighthearted novelty, but if you read right through to the end you’ll see the depth and beauty of what it is discussing. It talks about a series of 36 questions that have succeeded in making some people fall in love with each other, by bypassing all the usual small talk and getting right to the nitty gritty, exposing vulnerabilities and allowing people to open up to really being ‘seen’ by another. You can read the list of questions yourself to see what it’s all about, or read the full article here.

I think that these questions could be used by anyone, with anyone; friends, family, colleagues, lovers… to connect more deeply with them and create a stronger bond.

It is all about emotional intimacy, or as one of my favourite authors, Neale Donald Walsch calls it: IntoMeSee.

The article on the 36 questions emphasises that love is an action. It is a feeling, a knowing, yes, but it is also an action. Love not acted on will simply exist in a sort of limbo, and the questions used in this study are an example of how a sort of ‘love-based momentum’ can be established which may potentially allow love to blossom. But if it doesn’t, at least not in romantic form, then I believe that each person will at least come away with a greater understanding and appreciation of the other, a greater bond and connection, and that is a great thing.

~ The need for human connection and the value of establishing bonds with others is one of the reasons I love writing fiction that celebrates people’s lives and relationships. We can relate to reading about others who are or have been in similar situations, and it is rewarding to see characters overcome obstacles and challenges to reach a greater sense of wellbeing or ‘happy ending’. It connects us with a sense of hope in our own lives, and although the story may not be true, the emotion behind it is. Fiction can be both an escape from and a reflection of real life, and ironically, one of the most effective ways to hold a mirror up to life and express its truths.

So, to make a connection any day of the year, I challenge you to make an effort to connect more with others and spread the love around! 

  • Smile at a stranger. 🙂
  • Talk to someone in the street or at a shop (and not about the weather).
  • Ask a friend what they’re looking forward to over the next year.
  • Do an anonymous act of kindness.
  • Give someone flowers, not just on Valentines day, but any day – just because.
  • Write a letter to someone you care about . An actual letter. With paper and pen.
  • Send your loved one a text message when you’re not with them, just to say ‘I’m thinking about you’.
  • Tell people what you appreciate about them. Don’t let compliments go unspoken.
  • Tell someone how they’ve inspired you.
  • Hug your friends and family. Human touch is vital to wellbeing.
  • Shout someone a coffee, sit down with them, and listen attentively as they talk.
  • Email an author whose book you’ve enjoyed (hint hint!). 😉
  • Call someone for a chat, and ask thoughtful questions.
  • Ask an older person to tell you a story about their youth.
  • Read out loud to someone you love.
  • Write a poem for someone special.
  • And if you’re brave enough to try the 36 questions with someone, go for it!

Love,

Juliet xx


23698A new Tarrin’s Bay novel from best-selling author Juliet Madison. She took a break from real life,  and found what she didn’t know she was looking for.

Emma had plans, travel plans, going-far-away plans, but her family means everything to her, so when they needed help, she was there to deliver it. Running the family business of beachside cabins in Tarrin’s Bay might not be the same as the French Riviera, but Emma finds a certain level of peace in the beautiful setting and small town community.

But when she finds that her ex-boyfriend, a man she left behind without explanation, staying in one of the cabins, her peace is ruined. She knows the only way to get it back is to share the secret she’s been hiding for five years, and admit to him the limitations that she now carries. But James has his own truths to share, and he’s not the man that Emma once knew.

They are both in very different places than before, but it’s a time for renewal and second chances when their reunion brings secrets to the surface, dreams to be remembered, and the realisation that they are both in need of a little miracle.

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